All posts tagged SharePoint

Building a Modern SharePoint Solution: Part 9 – Starting a Microsoft Flow from a PowerApp

This is the final post in my series of building a modern SharePoint Solution.  In this post, I will demonstrate starting a Microsoft Flow from a PowerApp.  There are many reason’s why you would want this, but the most often used would likely be to allow the user to update an entry, save it and hold off sending it until they have all the information in place.  There are alternatives of course; like having a Flow wait for a value to change, but I prefer the user experience a button submission gives you.  Special note: Because Flow doesn’t currently allow for multiple triggers for a flow, we won’t be able to use flow created in Part 9 of this series.  However, I do suggest you not remove not remove it because this allows multiple ways to kick off the WF.

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Building a Modern SharePoint Solution: Part 8 – Sending a Tweet from Microsoft Flow

In my previous post, I showed you how to set up multiple approvals in a workflow. This post is going to continue along the requirements I set out in part 1 of this series.  I’ll be walking through sending a tweet from a Microsoft Flow.  It’s pretty straightforward.  Microsoft even has it as a template I believe, but I still wanted to illustrate how to do it because this is actually part of a bigger flow and an item in a solution’s requirements.  We’ll be continuing on from where I left off in part 8 of this series, but the steps I have here can be picked up and added to any flow you will be working on.

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Proper way to handle workflows that throw a Microsoft.Workflow.Client.ActivityValidationException

I had to build a fairly complex workflow not long ago.  The workflow was built in SharePoint Designer 2013 and had a lot of moving parts to it.  So many, that when I went to publish it I received the following error message: “Microsoft.Workflow.Client.ActivityValidationException: Workflow XAML failed validation due to the following errors: Activity “SomeXActivity” has 65 arguments, which exceeds the maximum number of arguments per activity (50).”  This error message is actually telling us that our workflow has too many variables within it.  Basically, this is happening because when the workflow is running the Workflow Manager has to manage more 58 (in my case) variables.  Workflow Manager only allows there to be 50 variables in the workflow… by default.

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Building a Modern SharePoint Solution: Part 6 – Create a Flow to be Started Manually

Finally moving on to Microsoft Flow.  I really like Flow.  It’s a great replacement for the SharePoint Designer Workflow and in my opinion a strong competitor to 3rd party workflows.  Don’t get me wrong, those other tools are great and I have used them happily in the past, but so far Microsoft Flow has met all of my recent needs and already covered by the O365 license I have.  If I don’t have to spend extra or my client doesn’t either and Flow meets our needs, then to me that is a huge bonus.  In today’s post, I am going to illustrate how to create a workflow that does NOT fire when an item is added.  This is because, for the requirements of this solution, users will want to be able to save the item without a workflow being initiated.  So in other words, I am going to show how to create a Flow to be started manually.  This can be done from the list, or in a later post I will show how to do it from the PowerApp form itself.

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Building a Modern SharePoint Solution: Part 1 – Preparing SharePoint

Today I want to start a new series around PowerApps and Flow and building out an entire solution that utilizes both of these tools.  Until recently, PowerApps was a separate application from SharePoint.  It could be attached to a list, but you were still limited to it being outside of the platform.  That all changed in the last quarter of 2017 (at least for those on first release).  If you are first release and using the new SharePoint list UI, then you can now build your forms in PowerApps like we used to with InfoPath (and some still do 🙁 ) and use them in place of the default SharePoint list forms.  This means you can now make your user interface nicer to use and add logic without having to utilize code, an outdated tool or pay for a more expensive tool to do that for you.  If you have licensing in O365, you have PowerApps and Flow available to you.  In this first post I am going to discuss the requirements and prepare SharePoint.  In the next post in the series show you how to integrate and build out your form for the solution.  Then we’ll add some logic and customizations to the form.  Once that’s done, we’ll bring out Flow and automate the processes behind the scenes.  Just a quick note, this series is designed to do as much OOTB as possible so some other logical enhancements like using other control types instead of the default data cards will be demonstrated in future posts.

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