All posts tagged O365

Microsoft PowerApps – Updating a Data Card from a Button

So the other day I was playing around with some field manipulation in PowerApps and thought about a use case I saw often with respect to updating fields when code from a button or some other action occurs.  Say for instance you wanted to update a hidden field with some information when a user clicked a button or completed some task on the form.  Maybe it isn’t a hidden field, but whatever the case may be, you need to be able to update that field.  I was surprised to note that it isn’t very intuitive in PowerApps, nor could I find much out there in the forums.  I did find some information around doing it with a Text Input field, but nothing specific to a data card.

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Microsoft Employee Engagement Summit – How to Engage Your Workforce

Are you looking at getting your employees more engaged with the tools you are using?  Are you looking to increase your efficiencies at your workplace in order to meet your business goals?  Then I suggest you take part in a free webinar hosted by Microsoft on March 20th.  In the webinar you will hear from other companies discuss how they engaged their workforce.  The webinar will provide insight into trends, challenges, and opportunities that influence the employee experience.  The webinar will help you understand how technology can drive and support change in your workforce by connecting everyone together at all levels within your company.

Kathleen Hogan, Chief People Officer at Microsoft, will also discuss how connecting their employees created a work culture transformation.  You will get to hear Microsoft’s external colleagues discuss stories, best practices, and business outcomes from employee engagement and communications initiatives.

 

You can sign up for the webinar here.

 

Thanks for reading!!

 

Using Microsoft Flow to Update a Field From a Lookup Column

While planning out a new series I want to do around PowerApps and Flow I realized one of the things I needed to do was get the value of a lookup field into a text field.  Now we all know that using a calculated field for this isn’t going to work since they can’t see lookup fields.  Yes I could use a choice field instead, but in this case I wanted a lookup field so that the users could easily update the choices from the lookup list.  There are a number of examples of doing this with a SharePoint Designer Workflow.  So I got thinking, but about Flow?  I found a number of examples of users asking for ways to do this or having problems doing it, but nothing really concrete.  So I decided to write something up quick as it really is very easy to do with flow.

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Best Practices in Waiting for a Value to Change in a SharePoint Designer Workflow

Back in October I did an overview of the different ways to wait for a change in a SharePoint Workflow.  You also have the option to wait for a certain time, there are two options which are waiting for a set duration or waiting until a set date.  Either of which are easy to control or set.  I am not focusing on these actions in this post, but just a quick note if you want the date to be dynamic when using wait until a date, then you will have to set the date you want in a workflow variable prior to setting the wait value.  Otherwise your date is going to have to be static and that’s probably not going to work for you in 99% of your workflows.

Today, however I want to discuss waiting for a value to change on the list your workflow is attached to.

Bit of a disclaimer: Why am I still talking about SharePoint Designer?  Why not Microsoft Flow?  Don’t worry, I have some Flow blogs planned.  However, Designer is still widely used and will be for some time.  I encourage others to use flow where they can, but remember that not everyone has access to that yet.  Designer is free and anyone with a SharePoint environment can make use of it.  Hence, I still see providing insight and knowledge on this product very important.

I have a bit of a TLDR here as you may be just looking for the answer, and not WHY it is occurring.  I strongly urge you to read the whole post to understand why things are the way they are and to make you a better person ;-p, but if you are in a hurry or think I talk\write too much, just click here to find out what you need to do.

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Modifying the PowerApps Display Styles Based on Field Values

By default, browsing items in a list with a PowerApp the items all look the same.  This is fine in most cases, but I want to ensure the managers viewing the items can see items that are older first.  I could do this by modifying the search parameters for the browse screen to put the oldest at the top, but I want the older ones to jump out a bit.  So right now logging in, a user is going to see this:

Modifying the PowerApps Display Styles Based on Field Values - Default View

I want to modify the view so that the text of each is a different color depending on the age of the request and also how close the request start date is from the current date.  So initially I want the colors set based on the following criteria:

  • If less than 7 days old: Green
  • If more than 7, but but less than 14: Yellow (<– Yellow on white background is hard to see)
  • If more than 14 days: Orange
  • If the current day is less than 21 days from the start date: Red

This is where conditionals come into play.  Like all programming languages, PowerApps allows you to use conditional statements to control objects.  If…then…else, switch statements, etc are all available to allow you to conditionally manipulate your environment.  In this case I want to use conditionals to control how the text will appear.

The format of an IF conditional is If(<Condition>,<then>,<else>) or If(<Condition>,<then>,<elseif condition>,<then>,….)

For example: if I wanted to use an if statement for the text color of the user’s name I would put the following formula on the color attribute:

Today() is a function similar in function to Date.Now().  So what the statement above states is if the item created date is within the last 7 days, change the color to green.  Applying the function to the above list items will give us the second item as green for the Name field:

Modifying the PowerApps Display Styles Based on Field Values - Formatting The Name

If I wanted to do show a couple of my options above I would need to use an if\elseif conditional.  So for the Green and Yellow conditional I want:

Modifying the PowerApps Display Styles Based on Field Values -  Multiple Conditionals

So that’s just two conditionals.  As you can see it could get pretty long.  I would love to say that we could move to a switch statement using something like this:

However, currently only comparisons to constants will work. For instance if you did a math calculation of “NumDaysDif = Today() – ThisItem.Created” and had a result of 5 you could then do this in your switch statement and get the result you want:

Unfortunately this is not an option currently.  So to accomplish what I want to do I need to write a long if statement.  The final statement will look something like this:

And when added to all of the fields in the Browse Gallery your result should look something like this:

Modifying the PowerApps Display Styles Based on Field Values - All Fields Updated

Pretty straight forward once you get going.

 

Thanks for reading!